Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Malala


Malala - wikipedia.org


How is it that each child is born, perfect and whole, yet some grow up to see only differences, to oppress others,  to become extremists, terrorists, suicide bombers, in the name of their beliefs?

"I raise up my voice....
so those without a voice 
can be heard."

How is it that, while each child is of equal worth at their time of birth simply by being born, some are born into excess, and some into want so severe they must seek their livelihoods on garbage dumps, and drink from fetid streams? Yet each new birth is as valuable as every other, to life and to nature. Each soul is smiled on as tenderly by Heaven, each heart dreams the same dream of life, each soul wishes only to live out its destiny. 


"Let us pick up 
our most powerful weapons-
our books and pens."

How can one gender make a case for oppressing the other? or one governing force believe it is justified in murdering its own people who hold differing beliefs? How is a man with a gun able to shoot in the face one small schoolgirl who wants only an education, and then go home and kiss his own small daughter?

"One child, one teacher,
one book and one pen
can change the world."

Yet how mighty the voice of that one small brave girl, speaking out against an oppressive regime, who refuses to be silenced, even by terrorists with bullets, and who thus gains the ears of the world.

                                              **********

Kids, I am struggling these days and my writing is as well. Bear with me. This is an attempt at a half-assed haibun. These are my thoughts in response to Susan's Mid Week Motif at Poets United: Equality. Right now I am reading Malala's book-the brave girl who was shot in the face by the Taliban for insisting on girls' rights to education, and who refused to be silenced. The quotes are from her speech to the United Nations last summer, on the day designated as World Malala Day.

11 comments:

  1. This is not half anything, but thoughtful, full of images and quotes that give the contemporary situation and hold up a living young woman who carries on work like that of Dr. King. It brought tears to my eyes. Thank you.

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  2. Don't know a haibun from a halibut, but I know that you have spoken truth here--so plainly that it cuts right to the heart. Make the words mean something is what I try to live by, and you have succeeded at that. Gloriously.

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  3. You have used the form quite effectively, Sherry! I like how you have mixed your own thoughts and questions with Malala's quotes. Her sentences make wonderful haiku!

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  4. Malala is definitely a shining star of an example of someone working for equality. It is amazing really to know even a part of her story! Your haibun definitely does her justice.

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  5. you raise some good points...i dont know where we went wrong...right now to me the big issues is selfishness and that it is all about me...you know...no one really cares or had compassion so when we see these things a blind eyes is turned...it does not concern us until it becomes our problem and then...oy...i need to check that book out....

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  6. There is power and hope here in the words of life that cab change the world. Awareness brings hope and liberty. Keep the faith.

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  7. I'm so pleased that you're aware of Malala. I signed her petition a few months ago. <3

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  8. It's a very, very good half bun. The prose is very poetic. I wonder how that man had the heart to shoot a small schoolgirl who just wanted to learn? But for these sick terrorists, educated people are their biggest enemies, for they'll bring and end to their reign of tyranny. I know the mindset of these terrorists because i've seen them in India. They want to keep people poor and uneducated so that they may remain in power. I just hope enough enlightened people rise up against them and fight violence with non-violence.
    I just have a suggestion. If you are finding it tough to write poetry, then why don't you try form. The constraints imposed upon you might actually spur your muse into action.

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  9. This was so beautiful and thought provoking!! Malala inspires you doesn't she? I have to read the book too!

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  10. This is a wonderful write, about a wonderful little girl. If you struggled it is carefully hidden.

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  11. She is a rebel and hope that lessons are learnt! wonderful

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