Saturday, April 7, 2018

Big Black Wolf as Beautician






She had given up the pink make-up by the time they met, behind which she had tried to hide her not-enoughness from the world. His wolfish, appraising eye and big-toothed smile, his unconditional love, filled up the empty places in her heart. They settled happily into life together, wild wolf, wild woman, galloping up and down the shore, and along the trails in the forest, him looking back over his shoulder, to make sure she was following. She learned no masks are possible, (or needed), when you love the wild. 

He taught her well. In older years, when one might soften the mask of aging with artifice, she cared not one whit, facing the world clear-eyed and honest, enough just as she was.

Wild hair, wild spirit,
she answered love's call ~
from mask to authenticity
is not so far to fall.



for Kerry's photo prompt at Real Toads: I chose the woman with the mask. This is an unconventional haibun. Because I am old, and I can break rules. LOL. A black wolf told me so.

I will also share this with the friendly folk at Poets United, where you will find good reading on a Sunday morning.

34 comments:

  1. What a great message, wonderfully expressed.

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  2. Love it Sherry. I don't feel that it is unconventional. A Haibun is a travelogue. You take your reader from a masked existence to authenticity with a whole lot of spirit and love. That's quite a journey.

    Elizabeth

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  3. Just far enough to fall! This is my new favorite!

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  5. Sherry, I love it!! I sat beside her in differential equations class. We sat in the back of the room, she was hiding there while doing work for another class. I needed her help, she made an "A", I my "C".
    She had straggly brownish blond hair, wore cutoffs, was generally barefoot, and left her yellow dog at the bottom of the steps to the building (along with quite a few others). After that class I never saw her again but she had grown up wild, I could tell. But I've written about her, I doubt she even remembers me.
    ..

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    1. Jim, how I love this story - and that girl and her dog. She knew herself while still young, a feat indeed.

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  6. I love this and relate to it very well. I have my four legged friend to share my trekking. I especially like
    "facing the world clear-eyed and honest, enough just as she was."

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  7. She learned no masks are possible, (or needed), when you love the wild.

    It is such a privilege to be able to see lots of goodness in nature, Sherry! And you have lots of it!

    Hank

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  8. they know our hearts and give all of theirs.

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  9. He certainly was beautiful - in every way. Great piece of writing!

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  10. Oh I love the poignancy with which this poem is penned especially; "She learned no masks are possible, (or needed), when you love the wild."💜

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  11. No masks needed in the wild, and animals accept you for who you are to them. Excellent reply to madame Arden.

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  12. Sherry, I like how you break the rules. I believe God gave us pets...as a reminder that true love has nothing to do with external beauty or character. You showed this well with your big, black wolf.

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  13. Yes, a dog does indeed accept us just as we are. No make-up necessary. Perfect JUST as is!! However that is.

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  14. This is so true our animal friends love us no matter what we are wearing. They see the heart inside.

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  15. I am glad you broke the rules with this one.....coming into our wild nature selves where there are no masks is so freeing....such bliss as was reading this exquisite poem Sherry!

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  16. I love the parting verse.. so very assured and wise

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  17. Love this Sherry, your words go straight to the heart!!

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  18. Pup knows all things, shares with his human!

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  19. I am so with you. Not because I've lived with a wild one, but I'm old too and finally getting more and more real.
    Great thoughts here.

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  20. Ha ha...the dog made you do it....uh huh ;)

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  21. "She learned no masks are possible, (or needed), when you love the wild."

    - So true, Sherry ! They see the heart and can sense the pure.

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  22. The wolf did good! An excellent breaking of the rules.
    I think I've only worn makeup thrice since hitting thirty (a long long time ago), at weddings. I prefer to be who I am and not hide under a mask. No one has complained yet...
    Anna :o]

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  23. Good heavens, girl. The opening sentence and closing two (italic) lines blew me away!

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  24. Hey Firewoman, writing from under the blue skies, you've dipped into the star-well and emerged with a gem of a piece -
    every line, word, phrase, and closing off "haiku-ish" bit is just dog-gone (sorry, I can't help myself today) perfect.

    You explore the (odd prompt image) and have totally made it yours, but it resonates with a universal growing into age and wisdom, walking with the wild, learning to live in the best song of all - harmony for the authentic, simple truth in Beauty, just as it is, as it should be, are you are.

    This is gorgeous - as both of you are.

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  25. Ok, OK, that was a grand reading for me. Another peek at that great Bard.
    ZQ

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  26. well done from a fellow rule breaker... :)

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  27. ☺luv this.
    Thank you for dropping by my Su day Standard today Sherry

    Much🌼love

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  28. This is awesome ... and really, really wise. Your decision to close with rhyme is inspired. It brought to mind the 'asides' uttered by the clever sprite, Puck in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Very cool!

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  29. I wish more women knew it wasn’t really far to fall from mask to authenticity. It takes us so long to realize.

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  30. the wolf was a great teacher and friend.

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  31. I like 'to hide her not-enoughness from the world'; and the lovely image of 'wild wolf, wild woman' settled happily into life together.

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  32. Dogs can teach us quite a lot can't they? Many years ago our dog Caesar would enjoy a walk with me off the lead through fields and woods until we reached the flowing stream. Straight in he would go then turn and you could hear him think "Aren't you going to come in too?"

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  33. This piece shows how write from the heart, Sherry; full of soul.

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I so appreciate you taking the time to read and comment.
Thank you so much. I will be over to see you soon!