Saturday, May 21, 2016

Hearts Stay the Same



Lili:
 The soft silk slides along my skin,
A door opens. I enter in,
Everything in me comes alive,
no more the strangle of suits and ties,
committed to (anything else a sham)
becoming who I am.

Gerda:
While Einar may be gone from me,
I see Lili has set you free.
I love your heart, which stays the same,
regardless of your change of name.
The hardest path is mine to know,
to love and, lovingly, let you go.


For my prompt at Real Toads: Play It Again, Toads.  I chose Fireblossom's prompt:  The Art of Gerda Wegener. Gerda Wegener's art, popular in the early 1900's, has recently enjoyed a resurgence. She was married to fellow artist, Einar Wegener, who, during their marriage, became Lili Elbe, one of the first recipients of sex reassignment surgery, from which, sadly, she did not survive

Lili became Gerda's favourite model, and the subject of many of her paintings. Gerda's and Lili's story is fascinating,  and has been made the subject of a recent film, The Danish Girl.  In my poem, I imagine what they may have said to each other as Einar transitioned to becoming Lili, and Gerda continued to love her.

source: Wikipedia


18 comments:

  1. Their love, was the type, poems and minstrels will write, for decades, to come, Sherry. Only hope, I find, such a love, as this.

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  2. It must have been that love that made the transition possible... support is needed not condemnation.. the voices seem so credible.

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  3. What beauty, Sherry. Your poem speaks of the sort of love that transcends everything, the sort of love to becomes legend in our hearts. Your note adds to the magic of the poem.

    As I told Therisa, in my reply to her poem, I can't believe I knew nothing about this pair. I'm angry because I wish I had known about it before, and extremely grateful because I get to experience it for the first time. I can't wait.

    Thank you for the prompts, and for your poem. ♥

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  4. This really gives me SO much to think about, Sherry.

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  5. You've caught it, Sherry. One of my favorites of yours.

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  6. Love this poem. I didn't know of them until the movie. Your dialogue wasn't in it. It's better!

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  7. I can only say "caution" as I think Hollywood is infamous for creating their own version of real life stories. When I fact check movies I have fallen I love with, I am often disappointed. Clear emotional voice in this poem, though.

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  8. I'm not too worried, kiddo. I wrote it the way I would like love to be.......smiles.

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  9. I really like the use of two voices here, and the positive message we need in these times.

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  10. Perfect form for your theme, Sherry. Getting into the poem, I wouldn't give her/him up as a friend. Who can be one hundred percent certain, I think many have some doubts, shades perhaps?
    Loved your prompt picks, I did a takeoff from street art.
    ..

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  11. Love transcends, as only love can. So beautifully illustrated in your poem.

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  12. A poem of great empathy and beautiful restraint, which achieves, I think, just the right tone.

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  13. Love so profound nothing could change it. The heart knows where it belongs. Beautiful Sherry...

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  14. I love that you let them both speak in the poem. It was a lovely tribute to such a strong love.

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  15. This is a fun and tragic poem. Very timely. I loved the words you imagined that they spoke to one another.

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  16. Wow Sherry! Your piece rang so true I think. What a sad story, that I knew nothing about. A subject on everyone's lips now. If she had not had the surgery she'd of lived, but obviously it was very important to her.

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