Sunday, April 14, 2013

Accessible Poetry


Running behind the herd as always, (a dangerous place for an aging creature!), I trip over Lolamouse's prompt at Toads, to write an "accessible poem" in the style of Billy Collins. My brain cells being fairly fried by now, I think much of my poetry is perhaps a little TOO accessible, sometimes, but I will try to Collins it up a notch for you, kind reader.

Wandering through the living room to let in 
half a dozen dogs,
I see a neatly beheaded small mouse - a shrew? - 
lying on the nearer dog bed.
The cat imperiously stalks past, likely
trying to send a message about
the calibre of her kibble.
How soon they forget being homeless,
and become demanding.

Why are they called shrews, I wonder. 
Or, alternatively, 
why are women called shrews when they complain?
Generally, we have a ton of good reasons to do so.
I pluck him from his decapitated end,
wrap him in paper toweling
and ponder:
garbage or compost?
Hmmm...........the Head Honcho
is not at home to ask.
Okay, garbage: swiftly done,
No One Will Ever Know -
other than you,
dear reader,
and you wont tell.

   ***   ***   ***

Oh, I LOVE accessible poetry. 
But if I start repeating myself, 
please do tell me. 
I'm old. 
It happens.


***   ***   ***

13 comments:

  1. Oh dear!! Headless human clones! Creepy.

    I love your conversational tone...I wouldn't mind residing in your mind for awhile, Sherry!! :) Great poem!

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  2. Okay, I enjoyed this until that last note. What on earth?

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  3. That is disturbing ~ I won't even touch it though ~ Yikes ~

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  4. Oh, this really creeps me. I couldn't deal with it. Yikes.

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  5. Sad...
    I won't tell....
    You do well at this poetic form!

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  6. Poem is great Sherry, but that last bit of info was really scary.

    Elizabeth

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  7. To wander through your thoughts...what a delight. There are times I hate science.

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  8. When I had two cats, I came home to find a headless mouse once. I decided the faster of the two cats had chased it down the hallway, and the fiercer cat had beheaded it in one bite.
    Nevertheless, the idea of headless mice being born in a lab is awful, and of headless human babies appalling.
    K

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  9. When I had two cats, I came home to find a headless mouse once. I decided the faster of the two cats had chased it down the hallway, and the fiercer cat had beheaded it in one bite.
    Nevertheless, the idea of headless mice being born in a lab is awful, and of headless human babies appalling.
    K

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  10. I like the way your contemplation of the mouse (shrew) made a segue to the discussion of labels, as they are used for women, and back again to the present problem of disposal.

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  11. I really enjoyed this, Sherry!

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  12. I saw a very large dead mouse yesterday while hiking... It was kind of flat... that is the image that filled MY mind reading your poem.

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  13. Hey - you know I am just doing "likes" shortly right? That will be tough on Google as they do not facilitate that system. Hugs.

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I so appreciate you taking the time to read and comment.
Thank you so much. I will be over to see you soon!